Selecting a Treatment Provider in Florida

Selecting a Treatment Provider in Florida

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4,698 people died in 2018 from an overdose in Florida — a mortality rate of 22.8.[1] To help reverse this trend, American Addiction Centers continues to focus on its mission to help people find treatment regardless of whether or not it is at one of our facilities. 

This page is a comprehensive resource of information about addiction treatment in Florida. We detail the different types of rehab in Florida, how to pay for private rehab, how to find state-funded resources, and where to look for accreditation information. 

Types of Rehab in Florida

There are three different types of treatment for those seeking help with substance abuse: detox, inpatient care, and outpatient care.

People struggling with addiction are vulnerable to the dangers associated with withdrawal. Detox is often the first step before moving to longer-term treatment options.[2] Detox includes medical support and guidance for an individual who is in withdrawal so they can physically stabilize before engaging in long-term, therapy-based treatment. Inpatient care involves a residential setting where patients receive around-the-clock care. Outpatient care is for those who have already completed inpatient care or for people who may not be able to take time away from work obligations or family responsibilities. 

 The table below showcases the number of rehab facilities in Florida that offer each level of care:

Type of Care, by number and percent
Facilities
No. %
Outpatient 598 82.37%
Regular 550 75.76%
Intensive 307 42.29%
Day Treatment/Partial Hospitalization 171 23.55%
Detoxification 78 10.74%
Methadone/buprenorphine maintenance or naltrexone treatment 177 24.38%
Residential (non-hospital) 212 29.20%
Short Term 123 16.94%
Long Term 150 20.66%
Detoxification 79 10.88%
Hospital Inpatient 59 8.13%
Treatment 43 5.92%
Detoxification 56 7.71%
Total 726 100.00%

 

Paying for Treatment in Florida

The expense of paying for individual treatment can be daunting for people seeking enrollment in an addiction treatment program, especially for those who do not have health insurance coverage. Most people in Florida attending treatment either use private or state insurance plans.

Addiction treatment can be costly. Projections anticipate that healthcare costs will rise to $6 trillion by 2027.[3] In 1993, the Marchman Act was passed in Florida to provide emergency intervention for those over-using drugs or alcohol. It outlines solutions for individuals, families, and organizations experiencing the negative impacts of the severe symptoms of substance abuse.[4]

How much treatment costs depends on several factors: the type of care required, whether it is inpatient or outpatient, the type of facility, the amenities, and more. Costs also depend on the type of treatment centers you choose, either state-funded or privately-funded.

State-Funded & Private Treatment in Florida

Private treatment is the best option for people with private insurance coverage through an employer. Those with independent financial security may also choose private treatment as well.

For people without employer-based insurance or who cannot otherwise afford private treatment, state-funded treatment is an option. These facilities are funded by several sources, including federal grants, state grants, or reimbursement through Medicaid.[5] Some offer sliding scale payments based on a person’s income. In many cases, prospective patients are placed on a waitlist with the most severe cases admitted first. Individuals should research how to qualify for public treatment programs to determine affordability.

Among the two options, private treatment is ideal considering the challenges that often arise seeking government-run addiction treatment programs,

The following table breaks down the number of facilities in Florida by whether they are private non-profit, private for-profit, locally funded, state-funded, or federally funded. 

Facility Operation, by number and percent
Facilities
No. %
Private Non-Profit 297 40.91%
Private for Profit 395 54.41%
Local, county, or community government 16 2.20%
State government 3 0.41%
Federal Government 15 2.07%
Tribal Government 0 0.00%
Total 726 100.00%

 

There are slightly more private for-profit treatment centers in Florida than private non-profit. However, when combined with facilities operated by state, local, and federal governments, there is almost a balance of non-profit facilities to choose from, which is good news for people for whom affordability is an issue. 

Treatment in Florida by Payment Option

While 521 of the total 726 treatment facilities accept private insurance, 692 also accept cash or self-payment. At least 187 of the 521 accept state-financed health insurance and 231 accept federal military insurance plans.

Yet in 2018, more than 2.8 million people in Florida — or nearly 14 percent of the population — did not have health insurance of any type.[6] While not having a private insurance plan might limit your options, always remember that there are several treatment facilities that will serve your needs regardless.

The table below breaks down the typical payment methods used and how many facilities in Florida accept each payment type. 

Facility Payment Options, by Number and percent
No. %
Cash or self-payment 692 95.32%
Private Health Insurance 521 71.76%
Medicare 185 25.48%
Medicaid 279 38.43%
State-financed Health insurance 207 28.51%
Federal military insurance 231 31.82%
No payment accepted (free treatment for all clients) 13 1.79%
IHS/Tribal/Union (ITU) funds 60 8.26%
Other payments 2 0.28%
Sliding fee scale 447 61.57%
Treatment at no charge or minimal payment for clients who can’t pay 282 38.84%
Total 726 100.00%

 

Although nearly 72 percent of facilities in Florida accept private insurance, 25 percent accept Medicare and 38 percent accept Medicaid payments. For clients who struggle with their finances, nearly 40 percent of facilities in Florida provide treatment at no charge or a minimal amount.

Treatment Center Accreditations in Florida

Now that you understand the types of care available, the differences in facility types, and how to pay for treatment, the last thing you’ll want to consider about a facility is its accreditation.

Reviewing accreditations is an important part of selecting the right treatment provider. In 2017, Florida HB 807 was signed into law to amend and expand requirements for substance abuse service providers, including requirements for adding requirements for marketing practices and revisions to the referral process, background screening establishing minimum standards for licensure of substance abuse service components, and authorizing the department to generate fines and requiring licensing fees to cover 100 percent of the cost of regulating these components.[7]

Additionally, patients can refer to the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), which accredits operators worldwide at the request of health and human service providers. The Joint Commission Accreditation for Addiction Treatment Providers (often referred to simply as the Joint Commission) also provides accreditation to service providers.[8]

Below is a table outlining the typical types of accreditations or licenses so you can understand what number of facilities have these and how common they are.

 

Facility Licensing, Certification, or Accreditation, by number and percent
No. %
Any listed agency/organization 692 95.32%
State substance abuse agency 583 80.30%
State mental health department 203 27.96%
State department of health 313 43.11%
Hospital licensing authority 40 5.51%
The Joint Commission 243 33.47%
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) 251 34.57%
National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) 13 1.79%
Council on Accreditation (COA) 22 3.03%
Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) 5 0.69%
Other national organization or federal, state or local agency 59 8.13%
Total 726 100.00%

 

The good news is that there are a number of reputable providers with accreditations serving the state of Florida. Almost all agencies (95 percent) have some kind of accreditation while almost all (80 percent) is an accredited state substance abuse agency.   You can rest assured there are many reputable options available no matter your individual circumstance.

Are You looking for Detox in Florida?

Struggling with Withdrawal can be the most difficult part of achieving sobriety. It can also be the most dangerous. At American Addiction Centers, our mission is to help people achieve sobriety safely and effectively. As a leading provider of addiction treatment, we operate facilities all across the nation. One in Tampa and one also in Hollywood.

If you are looking for help and aren’t sure where to start, give our confidential helpline a call. You’ll speak with one of our admissions navigators. Their purpose is to answer your questions and help you find treatment either at one of our facilities or educate you on where you may be able to find treatment if we are not a fit.

[1] “Drug Overdose Mortality by State,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 29, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] Emily Guarnotta, “Drug & Alcohol Withdrawal Information,” Withdrawal.net, https://www.withdrawal.net/treatment/information/.

[3] “Healthcare Costs For Americans Projected to Grow at an Alarming Rate,” Peter G. Peterson Foundation, May 1, 2019. https://www.pgpf.org/blog/2019/05/healthcare-costs-for-americans-projected-to-grow-at-an-alarmingly-high-rate#:~:text=Healthcare%20Costs%20Continue%20to%20Rise,to%20%246%20trillion%20by%202027.

[4] “About Us,” Marchman Act Florida, https://marchmanactflorida.com/about/.

[5] Meredith Watkins, “How to Find a State-Funded Rehabilitation Center,” American Addiction Centers, May 18, 2020, https://americanaddictioncenters.org/rehab-guide/state-funded.

[6] Cindy, Krischer Goodman, “Millions of Floridians Now Living Without Health Insurance,” South Florida Sun Sentinel, May 23, 2019, https://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/fl-ne-uninsured-20190523-fyu2oz2e6zamrh3halunrfkuzq-story.html.

[7] Mary Wei and Darrell Anderson, “Joint Commission Accreditation for Addiction Treatment Providers,” The Joint Commission, October 2, 2018, https://www.jointcommission.org/-/media/tjc/idev-imports/topics-assets/webinar-replay-and-slides-for-oct-2-webinar-introduction-to-joint-commission-accreditation-for-addic/joint_commission_addiction_tx_webinar_1002pdf.pdf?db=web&hash=AC017CBA328D8A12400B288C1CD2EC35.

[8] “Evolving With Care,” The Joint Commission, https://www.jointcommission.org/.