How to find rehab in Montana - Withdrawal

How to find rehab in Montana

Finding detox in Montana can be difficult. Here's everything you need to know about MT rehab options and how to find local treatment as soon as possible.


Takeaways from this article:

  • american addiction centers photo

    Types of rehab in Montana

  • american addiction centers photo

    How to pay for detox in Montana

  • american addiction centers photo

    State-funded-rehab in Montana


Montana’s drug mortality rate is 14.1 percent per 100,000 people. That means that 143 people perished from a drug overdose in 2018.[1] Unfortunately, the substance abuse trend continues to rise in Montana and the U.S. Due to this dangerous trend, The American Addiction Centers has increased its efforts to help the citizens of Montana find affordable care so they can recover from substance addiction. Taking the first step toward recovery is not an easy task. However, we are here to offer support and help you find the information you need to find a quality, accredited treatment.

We have put together helpful information to help you find everything you need to know about choosing the right treatment center. There’s additional information about the significant steps in the recovery process and the importance of picking an accredited facility. Together, we can help you beat your addiction and get on the road to recovery.

Detox & Rehab Options in Montana

Patients receive substance abuse care in an inpatient or outpatient facility. The biggest difference between the facilities is where the patient lives during treatment. However, before a patient enters either facility type, they must first undergo detoxification. During the detox process, the addictive substance is removed from the body.[3] The process can be painful and is very stressful for the patient. It is a necessary step to prepare the mind and body for the long-term recovery process.

To help moderate some of the stress and pain during detox, many facilities administer a medically supervised detox program. In this type of program, the patient is given medication and therapy to help manage withdrawal pain. After detox, the patient enters the next phase—long-term counseling. This phase addresses the core of the addiction for the patent to recover fully. [4]

Patients in an inpatient facility live on site. These facilities offer more intensive care, and the patient has access to medical staff 24/7. Whereas in an outpatient facility, the patient lives at home and attends counseling and therapy at the treatment center. This type of care is more flexible and perfect for patients with limited leave time or personal home obligations. Regardless of the facility type, both offer treatment that will help you overcome addiction.

Listed below are the number of treatment facilities in Montana that offer each level of care:

Type of Care, by number and percent
Facilities
No. %
Outpatient 63 87.50%
Regular 63 87.50%
Intensive 36 50.00%
Day Treatment/Partial Hospitalization 9 12.50%
Detoxification 13 18.06%
Methadone/buprenorphine maintenance or naltrexone treatment 25 34.72%
Residential (non-hospital) 18 25.00%
Short Term 14 19.44%
Long Term 13 18.06%
Detoxification 10 13.89%
Hospital Inpatient 6 8.33%
Treatment 4 5.56%
Detoxification 6 8.33%
Total 72 100.00%

Paying for Withdrawal Treatment in Montana

The number one reason why uninsured or financially insecure patients choose not to receive professional treatment for substance abuse is their inability to afford it. [5] Substance abuse treatment is expensive. The average price for outpatient care ranges from $3,000 to $10,000 for 90 days, and inpatient care ranges from $5,000 to $20,000 for 30 days. [6] Fortunately, many inpatient and outpatient treatment centers offer low-cost and sometimes free programs for uninsured patients in addition to accepting health insurance.

Patients with health insurance typically choose private facilities due to the diversity in amenities, treatment options, and low patient-to-staff. Uninsured patients can receive quality treatment in a state-funded facility free of charge if they qualify. Although state facilities do not offer as many amenities or treatment options due to limited funding, they provide therapy for lower-income patients for free. To help pay for treatment, here are several options in the state of Montana to help lower-income patients. A few of these assistance programs include grants or services sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Medicare and Medicaid, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and The Affordable Care Act (ACA). [13].

State Funded Rrehab vs. Private Rehab in Montana

Substance abuse treatments are either private or state-funded facilities. For those with health insurance, a private facility is preferred [7]. The state government funds a state facility. These facilities often have a limited budget and do not offer as many services or amenities as a private clinic. To receive treatment in a state-funded facility, a patient must go through a qualification process. The patient is selected based on the severity of addiction and income level.[8] State facilities may not offer as many amenities but are a viable option for uninsured or lower-income patients to get the proper and evidence-based care so they can break free from addiction.

The table below lists Montana Facilities’ number by private nonprofit, private for-profit, locally funded, state-funded, or federally funded.

Facility Operation, by number and percent
Facilities
No. %
Private Non-Profit 38 52.78%
Private for Profit 17 23.61%
Local, county, or community government 0 0.00%
State government 2 2.78%
Federal Government 9 12.50%
Tribal Government 6 8.33%
Total 72 100.00%

Regardless of your current health insurance status, there are many substance abuse treatment options in Montana.

Treatment Payment Options in Montana

There are 72 substance abuse clinics in Montana, and 66 of them accept private insurance. At least 49 clinics accept state-financed health insurance, and 45 accept federal military insurance plans. Many of these facilities also offer other options for payment.

Montana’s uninsured rate is 8.2 percent, just slightly above the national uninsurance rate of 8 percent. [10] Although many Montana residents have some health insurance, there are many treatment facilities in Montana with programs to assist uninsured patients to afford substance abuse care expenses in their facility.

The table below lists the payment methods used and how many Montana facilities accept each payment type.

Facility Payment Options, by Number and percent
No. %
Cash or self-payment 65 90.28%
Private Health Insurance 66 91.67%
Medicare 30 41.67%
Medicaid 62 86.11%
State-financed Health insurance 49 68.06%
Federal military insurance 45 62.50%
No payment accepted (free treatment for all clients) 1 1.39%
IHS/Tribal/Union (ITU) funds 32 44.44%
Other payments 0 0.00%
Sliding fee scale 39 54.17%
Treatment at no charge or minimal payment for clients who can’t pay 34 47.22%
Total 72 100.00%

About 92 percent of Montana Treatment centers accept private insurance, around 42 percent accept Medicare, and 86.1 percent accept Medicaid payments. For clients with lower income or uninsured patients, 54.2 percent of the facilities use a sliding fee scale based on income, and 47.2 percent provide treatment at no charge or a minimal amount.

Finding Accredited Treatment Centers in Montana

Although Montana has several quality treatment facilities, selecting the best option should not be solely based on your insurance coverage. An accredited facility has taken the extra step to ensure that the quality of care they offer meets the strict national standards set forth by governing bodies. All substance abuse facilities meet state licensure requirements, but an accredited facility goes above and beyond to deliver top-notch care approved by experts in the field.

Several third-party organizations supervise the accreditation process. These organizations ensure that facilities meet the agency’s strict standards by examining the staff, facility, programs, and more. An accredited facility commits to ongoing training and must maintain compliance with privacy laws.

Three leading governing agencies that offer accreditation are The Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment of 2018 for Patients and Communities Act (SUPPORT), The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and The Joint Commission Accreditation for Addiction Treatment Providers (Joint Commission).

SUPPORT is a bipartisan bill that was passed in Congress to address the nation’s opioid overdose epidemic. It certifies that treatment and care administered to patients meet nationally recognized guidelines for quality and uniform behavioral health care. [11] CARF, the largest U.S. accrediting organization, oversees addiction facilities and evaluates substance abuse and dual diagnosis programs. The Joint Commission, the second-largest substance abuse accreditation program and the largest organization that accredits medical facilities and hospitals, is the third major organization that oversees accreditation. [12]

The table below lists the typical accreditation types or licenses to help you understand the number of accredited facilities and how common they are.

Facility Licensing, Certification, or Accreditation, by number and percent
No. %
Any listed agency/organization 63 87.50%
State substance abuse agency 53 73.61%
State mental health department 22 30.56%
State department of health 21 29.17%
Hospital licensing authority 4 5.56%
The Joint Commission 7 9.72%
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) 14 19.44%
National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) 5 6.94%
Council on Accreditation (COA) 1 1.39%
Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) 2 2.78%
Other national organization or federal, state or local agency 3 4.17%
Total 72 100.00%

Many facilities in Montana have accredited providers. Over 94 percent of all facilities have some accreditation, and 84.5 percent are accredited state substance abuse agencies.


[1] “Drug Overdose Mortality by State,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm
[2] “Drug Overdose Deaths in the United States” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services, January 2020 https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db356-h.pdf
[3] “Detox Treatment for Withdrawal” American Addiction Centers, October 2020. https://www.withdrawal.net/detox/
[4] “Types of Treatment Programs” National Institutes of Health, January 2018. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/drug-addiction-treatment-in-united-states/types-treatment-programs
[5]https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabsPDFWHTML2013/Web/PDFW/NSDUH-DetTabsSect5seTabs54to56-2013.pdf
[6] “How Much Does Rehab Cost?” Help.org, August 2019. https://www.help.org/rehab-cost/
[7] “How to Pay for Detox and Rehab” American Addiction Centers, November 2020. https://www.withdrawal.net/guides/payment-options/
[8] Meredith Watkins, “How to Find a State-Funded Rehabilitation Center,” American Addiction Centers, May 18, 2020, https://americanaddictioncenters.org/rehab-guide/state-funded.
[9] “Substance Abuse Services” Department of Human Services
Services https://www.dhs.pa.gov/Services/Assistance/Pages/Substance-Abuse.aspx
[10]Edward R. Berchick, Jessica C. Barnett, and Rachel D. Upton, “Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2018” US Census Bureau, November 2019, https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2019/demo/p60-267.pdf
[11] “Federal Laws Related to SAMHSA” SAMSA, April 2020, https://www.samhsa.gov/about-us/who-we-are/laws-regulations
[12] “Evolving With Care,” The Joint Commission, https://www.jointcommission.org/.
[13] “Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration”: https://www.samhsa.gov/grants