How to find rehab in Oregon - Withdrawal

How to find rehab in Oregon

Finding detox in Oregon can be difficult. Here's everything you need to know about OR rehab options and how to find local treatment as soon as possible.


Takeaways from this article:

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    Types of rehab in Oregon

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    How to pay for detox in Oregon

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    State-funded-rehab in Oregon


Many states in the U.S. are significantly affected by the opioid epidemic. Unfortunately, Oregon is not exempt. Oregon has a drug overdose mortality rate of 12.6 per 100,000 people. This rate equals 547 people that perished due to a drug overdose in 2018. [1] Oregon’s substance abuse mortality rate is quite a bit smaller than the national rate, which is 20.7 per 100,000. [2]

Nonetheless, American Addiction centers are committed to reducing substance addiction in the U.S. We are here to help you find affordable treatment and support to overcome substance abuse addiction.

On this page, you will find information about the types of treatment programs available in Oregon. Additionally, this page will provide you with information on accredited programs and facilities and the types of payment options available for substance abuse addiction treatment.

Oregon Withdrawal Treatment Options

Substance abuse treatment is a two-step process. The first step is detoxification. This process is necessary to remove the addictive substance from the body. After detox, the patient enters inpatient or outpatient care.

Detox is the most stressful and sometimes painful step in the recovery process. When the body withdrawals from an addictive substance, the body may experience several physiological effects [3]. Although it may be unpleasant, detoxification is necessary to prepare the patient for successful, long-term treatment. Fortunately, most treatment centers administer a medical detox, which is less stressful and painful for the patient.

After detox, the patient may move into inpatient or outpatient care. Some patients prefer outpatient care because it’s more flexible. Inpatient care requires the patient to reside in the facility for a while. In outpatient care, the patient can go home overnight. This option is good for those who can not take time off from work or have young children to take care of.

Both inpatient and outpatient care provides the necessary support and counseling to address the psychological, social, and behavioral problems associated with substance addiction. [4]

In the table below is a list of the number of treatment facilities in Oregon That offer each level of care:

Type of Care, by number and percent
Facilities
No. %
Outpatient 205 89.52%
Regular 197 86.03%
Intensive 141 61.57%
Day Treatment/Partial Hospitalization 29 12.66%
Detoxification 19 8.30%
Methadone/buprenorphine maintenance or naltrexone treatment 50 21.83%
Residential (non-hospital) 38 16.59%
Short Term 25 10.92%
Long Term 32 13.97%
Detoxification 23 10.04%
Hospital Inpatient 4 1.75%
Treatment 1 0.44%
Detoxification 4 1.75%
Total 229 100.00%

Paying for Withdrawal Treatment in Oregon

Once you have an idea of the type of care you’re looking for, the next step is determining what type of facility matches your financial situation best.

Most patients pay for treatment with private or state health insurance. For those without health insurance, substance abuse treatment may seem out of reach. Many uninsured Oregon residents choose not to receive substance abuse treatment due to the cost [5]. The average cost for outpatient treatment $3,000 to $10,000 for 90 days and inpatient care ranges from $5,000 to $20,000 for 30 days. [6]

Fortunately, the state of Oregon is committed to providing education and resources to reduce substance abuse. The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) opioid initiative brings together health experts and communities to reduce deaths and non-fatal overdose to Oregonians [13]. The Oregon legislature passed an omnibus bill early in 2014 that expanded the Oregon Health Plan’s budget and allowed more people to qualify for Medicaid. In combination with the Affordable Care Act, that expansion allowed more people to obtain health insurance [14].

This means that for those with private insurance, and those without, there are a variety of options. They usually break down into two major categories: State-Funded Rehab and Private Rehab.

State-Funded Rehab vs. Private Rehab

Private facilities are the best option for those with private health insurance because they offer more amenities and treatment programs. Private insurance plans typically cover the majority of the cost of addiction treatment[7]. Patients without health insurance often receive treatment in state-funded facilities.

Facilities funded by the state offer low-cost and sometimes free treatment. State-funded facilities are a viable treatment option for uninsured patients.

Although both private and state facilities offer accredited care, state facilities rely on funding from federal and state grants or Medicaid reimbursement.[8] Often, limited funding means that space is limited and a long waiting list. There is also a qualification process that patients must undergo to receive treatment.

Below lists the number of Oregon facilities by private non-profit, private for-profit, locally funded, state-funded, or federally funded.

Facility Operation, by number and percent
Facilities
No. %
Private Non-Profit 130 56.77%
Private for Profit 66 28.82%
Local, county, or community government 20 8.73%
State government 1 0.44%
Federal Government 4 1.75%
Tribal Government 8 3.49%
Total 229 100.00%

Withdrawal Treatment Payment Options in Oregon

There are 229 substance abuse treatment facilities in Oregon. Of the 229 facilities, 202 accept private insurance, and many clinics offer alternative payment options. At least 146 of the 229 accept state-financed health insurance, and 89 accept federal military insurance plans.

The uninsured rate in Oregon is 7.1 percent—that is slightly below the national uninsurance average. [10] Regardless of your health insurance status, many treatment facilities in Oregon are willing to work with your financial situation to help you find an option you can afford.

The table below lists the typical payment methods used and how many Oregon facilities accept each payment type.

Facility Payment Options, by Number and percent
No. %
Cash or self-payment 212 92.58%
Private Health Insurance 202 88.21%
Medicare 80 34.93%
Medicaid 196 85.59%
State-financed Health insurance 146 63.76%
Federal military insurance 89 38.86%
No payment accepted (free treatment for all clients) 1 0.44%
IHS/Tribal/Union (ITU) funds 55 24.02%
Other payments 0 0.00%
Sliding fee scale 168 73.36%
Treatment at no charge or minimal payment for clients who can’t pay 119 51.97%
Total 229 100.00%

A Little over 88 percent of Oregon treatment facilities accept private insurance, 34.9 percent accept Medicare, and 85.6 percent accept Medicaid payments. For clients with lower income,73.4 percent of the facilities use a sliding fee scale based on income, and 52 percent provide treatment at no charge or a minimal amount.

If you’re wondering whether or not you’re covered, use the form below to check your exact coverage.

Withdrawal Treatment Center Accreditations in Oregon

For most people, choosing a treatment facility is solely based on insurance acceptance. Finding a facility in your insurance network is important, but facilities should also be evaluated on their accreditation status. Accredited facilities use research-based practices that meet nationally recognized standards in addiction medicine.

The Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment of 2018 (SUPPORT) for Patients and Communities Act standardizes how treatment and care are administered to patients. Facilities accredited through SUPPORT employ nationally recognized guidelines to ensure that the behavioral health workforce’s quality care is uniform. [11]

The Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) can also help you find an accredited facility or practitioner. Another source to help you find accredited providers is the Joint Commission Accreditation for Addiction Treatment Providers (Joint Commission), the governing body that provides accreditation to service providers.[12]

In the table below, you will find a list of the typical accreditation types or licenses to help you understand the number of accredited facilities and how common they are.

Facility Licensing, Certification, or Accreditation, by number and percent
No. %
Any listed agency/organization 223 97.38%
State substance abuse agency 211 92.14%
State mental health department 131 57.21%
State department of health 66 28.82%
Hospital licensing authority 5 2.18%
The Joint Commission 13 5.68%
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) 27 11.79%
National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) 2 0.87%
Council on Accreditation (COA) 7 3.06%
Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) 0 0.00%
Other national organization or federal, state or local agency 7 3.06%
Total 229 100.00%

The State of Oregon has several reputable accredited providers. Over 97 percent of all facilities have some accreditation, and 92.1 percent are accredited state substance abuse agencies. With that said, you can rest assured that there are options available regardless of your insurance status.

If you still have questions, that’s okay. We can help. Give us a call on our confidential helpline and speak to one of our team members. We can be reached at 1-888-935-1318.

[1] “Drug Overdose Mortality by State,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm
[2] “Drug Overdose Deaths in the United States” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services, January 2020 https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db356-h.pdf
[3] “Detox Treatment for Withdrawal” American Addiction Centers, October 2020. https://www.withdrawal.net/detox/
[4] “Types of Treatment Programs” National Institutes of Health, January 2018. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/drug-addiction-treatment-in-united-states/types-treatment-programs
[5]https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabsPDFWHTML2013/Web/PDFW/NSDUH-DetTabsSect5seTabs54to56-2013.pdf
[6] “How Much Does Rehab Cost?” Help.org, August 2019. https://www.help.org/rehab-cost/
[7] “How to Pay for Detox and Rehab” American Addiction Centers, November 2020. https://www.withdrawal.net/guides/payment-options/
[8] Meredith Watkins, “How to Find a State-Funded Rehabilitation Center,” American Addiction Centers, May 18, 2020, https://americanaddictioncenters.org/rehab-guide/state-funded.
[9] “Substance Abuse Services” Department of Human Services
Services https://www.dhs.pa.gov/Services/Assistance/Pages/Substance-Abuse.aspx
[10]Edward R. Berchick, Jessica C. Barnett, and Rachel D. Upton, “Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2018” US Census Bureau, November 2019, https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2019/demo/p60-267.pdf
[11] “Federal Laws Related to SAMHSA” SAMSA, April 2020, https://www.samhsa.gov/about-us/who-we-are/laws-regulations
[12] “Evolving With Care,” The Joint Commission, https://www.jointcommission.org/.
[13] “Oregon Pain Guide,” Oregon Health Authority. https://www.oregonpainguidance.org/oregon-health-authority/state-goals/
[14] “Oregon and the ACA’s Medicaid expansion” Health Insurance.org https://www.healthinsurance.org/oregon-medicaid/